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Practical Pest Management Solutions With IPM

Recently, Integrated Pest Management (IPM) is now quite a buzz word in the agriculture arena. However, the fundamental meaning of IPM is that it is a pest control strategy that uses a mix of physical, biological, cultural, and chemical methods, to call a few. The methods are conducted in three stages, from prevention to observation, and to intervention. IPM is recognized as a holistic approach created to cut back as well as eliminate the usage of pesticides altogether.

Whether you spent your Winter holidays looking to get gone the rodents or whatever other pest was lurking around at home, now could be a good time to keep those activities, so long as cold temperatures is here. Spend your February on limiting pest access within an IPM way. Here are a number of the ways you are able to participate in an all natural pest management activity, without needing harmful pesticides, an advantage for you personally and your family.

Check Door/Garage Door Sweeps

Your door sweeps and seals, mostly employed for blocking wind and weather, can also serve as a way to stop pests from entering. Door bottoms can shift and lose their ability to help keep out intruders, so it's recommended to test them and ensure the elements stripping remains performing pestsmartcontrol. If you will see light arriving from underneath the entranceway, the seal needs to be fixed. Garage doors may have the same problem. Check your windows and screens as well and any openings that pests may use to enter the home.

Maintain and Monitor Your Soil Level

Modern home designs have foundations which are tall enough to ensure that no wooden part of the structure is within eight inches of the ground, in order to prevent termites from attacking and consuming wood without ever leaving the comfort of the ground.

With this particular in mind, it's recommended to scoop out any excess soil along the medial side of the foundation, so you are not giving termites and other pests that extra leverage to obtain in at a vital entry point. The important thing is keep the soil level below the amount of the foundation.

Remove Debris

Along with maintaining the soil level, it's also advisable to do a cleanup of any leaves and/or debris which have accumulated near or at the foundation of one's home. Debris is only going to encourage rodents to create a nest by your house and supply a "stakeout" for rodents to have the ability to gain easier access in to the home.

Trim Your Trees

To keep out squirrels and other such rodents from entering via an attic or another structure from the roof of your home, focus on trimming your tree limbs. Rodents can gain access to the house by utilizing tree branches, especially the ones that overlap the roof line, to get involved with the home. Trim your limbs back to at the least eight to ten feet from the roof. If you don't feel confident with tree trimming, an alternate option is to position sheet metal bands around the trunks of the trees to discourage squirrels and other rodents from climbing them.

Remove Excess Plant Growth

As stated with trimming tree limbs, the same relates to plants around your home. Pruning appropriately will help stave off pests or at the least provide some control. Experts recommend pruning plants when they're young to minimize the necessity to remove large limbs later on, thus avoiding large pruning wounds. If you can find pests using one area of the plant, you are able to prune them out as well.

Store Firewood Properly

If your house has a fireplace that you and the family want to gather around during cold temperatures, then you should be worried about the manner in which you store the firewood that you use. Insects can emerge from the firewood that you have at home, and without necessarily harmful, these bugs could be very a nuisance. Pests such as for instance termites, wood-boring beetles and carpenter ants can often be found feeding within the logs of the firewood.

Store firewood outdoors away from the house and off the ground - this may increase air circulation for drying and helps prevent logs from being too moist. Before bringing in firewood, shake or knock the logs together to get rid of any insects still on the bark. It's also possible to want to test the bottom of log carriers because insects can crawl into them when logs are brought inside. 

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