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True2Ourselves Forums   > Community Topics > Theology  > The Book of Job: how do you read it?

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Old 02-09-2011, 09:16 AM
ahigherway's Avatar
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Default The Book of Job: how do you read it?

Hi everyone,
to avoid derailing another thread on another topic, I wanted to start a discussion here about Job.
There are many things I may still learn about this fascinating book. However, a few things seem quite clear to me already:

1) Job was righteous until he began blaming God for his problems. So Job did indeed sin, and had to repent in the end

2) Elihu is a type of "mediator," very similar to both John the Baptist and Jesus himself, mediating between God and man (Job)

3) the encounter between Job and God (last 5 chapters) seems to me a type of example of "judgement day." God reveals His glory to Job, and Job realizes that he is nothing compared to God. Abased and humbled, God is able to "lift him up."

4) when we lift ourselves up, we are in error. When God lifts us up, it is for our glory and His.

5) satan is a tool used by God to perfect mankind. Job's pride had to be removed, and God used satan to bring this work to a good end.


Any thoughts?
How do you read Job?

Blessings to all,
brian
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Old 02-09-2011, 10:42 AM
Giuliano
 
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Default Re: The Book of Job: how do you read it?

Quote:
Originally Posted by ahigherway View Post
Hi everyone,
to avoid derailing another thread on another topic, I wanted to start a discussion here about Job.
There are many things I may still learn about this fascinating book. However, a few things seem quite clear to me already:

1) Job was righteous until he began blaming God for his problems. So Job did indeed sin, and had to repent in the end
The book says Job was righteous. It does not say he was wise.

There are two ways to spell "perfect" in Hebrew. The one used of Job is Tam = 440. The other way is Tamiym = 490. I believe Job was perfect in one way; but following "Pentecost," he was perfect in another.

Quote:
2) Elihu is a type of "mediator," very similar to both John the Baptist and Jesus himself, mediating between God and man (Job)
This seems right since Elihu says:

Job 33:23 If there be a messenger with him, an interpreter, one among a thousand, to shew unto man his uprightness:
24 Then he is gracious unto him, and saith, Deliver him from going down to the pit: I have found a ransom.
25 His flesh shall be fresher than a child's: he shall return to the days of his youth:
26 He shall pray unto God, and he will be favourable unto him: and he shall see his face with joy: for he will render unto man his righteousness.


We saw (in the other thread) that Satan and Job's wife are not mentioned after Elihu appears. The question is if something has been transformed here? Has the "fallen spiritual nature" of Job as shown by Satan and his wife who tells him to curse God been transformed into the Holy Spirit as shown by Elihu?

I mention his wife since she reminds me of Sarah who laughed at God. She and Abraham could not conceive the child of promise correctly when Sarah had not yet mastered the serpent-nature within herself? We see Abraham and Sarah becoming one and Isaac born after Abraham is told to perfect himself. The text does not say Sarah perfected herself; but if the two are one, surely she did.

The name changes show something too. Abram picked up the feminine -h in his name; and Sarah acquired the masculine -yod. I think this shows how they both were no longer spiritually either male or female but both.

That is reflected too in how Sarah got Abraham into trouble by advising him to take Hagar as a concubine. This was the "fallen woman" speaking -- and Abram mistakenly heeded her. But later, God tells Abraham to HEED her -- obey whatever she advises. Something has changed.

I think something changed too with Job's wife although it is not explicitly stated. There may have been something wrong with the first children -- just as there was something wrong with Esau.

Since I read both Job and Genesis as book of prophecies, it does not surprise me to see how Rebekkah is reversing some of the harm done by Eve; and if Job is read as an allegory of Israel, it would similar to the story of Rebekkah.

Quote:
3) the encounter between Job and God (last 5 chapters) seems to me a type of example of "judgement day." God reveals His glory to Job, and Job realizes that he is nothing compared to God. Abased and humbled, God is able to "lift him up."
I wouldn't go too far down this path for fear of allowing my "humility" to be false humilty. I would say this, that it is God's pleasure that we do the right things and love others; and if we do that, it is then His Pleasure to reward us. Nothing good exists which does not come from God, that is just a fact. Pride or humilty are not relevant; but pride is an obstacle.

Quote:
4) when we lift ourselves up, we are in error. When God lifts us up, it is for our glory and His.
In a way, the best praise one can give God is to turn out well.

Quote:
5) satan is a tool used by God to perfect mankind. Job's pride had to be removed, and God used satan to bring this work to a good end.
Satan has his job to perform; and we see that God starts the conversation with him about Job. The "power" of Satan seems to me to be a breaking out of light on "the left side" which then congeals into an opposing force. This is the spiritual flaw which demands perfection now, without hope of mercy or forgiveness. If something is flawed, the satanic theory goes, it was a mistake to make it. It should be destroyed for its flaws following strict justice.

Often there is some truth behind the accusations of Satan -- just as there was when he charged Joshua the High Priest of having soiled garments. That was the truth, but it was not an eternal truth. It was a passing kind of truth, in time only -- and God's solution was to provide clean garments. Mercy and forgiveness can solve things. The cry for "strict justice here and now" is not reasonable or correct even if it contains kernels of truth.
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Old 02-09-2011, 01:23 PM
Josiah
 
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Default Re: The Book of Job: how do you read it?

.


I tend to read it as a play....

I think it's hypothetical in a sense, a rather extreme case of bad happening to good.

I take it as a study of why bad things happen to good people, only it never really answers that question, instead, during the course of the play, it changes the issue from WHY bad things happen to WHAT we need to think/do/believe when bad things happen.




.
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Old 02-10-2011, 12:40 AM
Giuliano
 
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Default Re: The Book of Job: how do you read it?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Josiah View Post
.


I tend to read it as a play....

I think it's hypothetical in a sense, a rather extreme case of bad happening to good.

I take it as a study of why bad things happen to good people, only it never really answers that question, instead, during the course of the play, it changes the issue from WHY bad things happen to WHAT we need to think/do/believe when bad things happen.
If we think rightly, we may see that what we thought was bad was the agent of change for the better.

Genesis, which I read as a book of prophecy as I read Job, is filled with sibling rivalry, parents showing favoritism, and the like. Look at what with Joseph says in the last chapter:

Genesis 50:19 And Joseph said unto them, Fear not: for am I in the place of God?
20 But as for you, ye thought evil against me; but God meant it unto good, to bring to pass, as it is this day, to save much people alive.
21 Now therefore fear ye not: I will nourish you, and your little ones. And he comforted them, and spake kindly unto them.


Isn't the idea of the "suffering servant" there? Some suffering is pointless; but if we are willing to suffer out of love, one can become the servant of God, acting on His behalf on earth.

Job ends by having his sacrifices and prayers being made acceptable. The concept of favoritism is in Job too. His prayers for his children were partial. He was praying for them because of their relationship with him. Did he care about his neighbor's children also? Did he worry about them? No. His prayers were about "me and mine." I think at the end, Job realized God loves everyone -- he didn't need to worry about it or worry about his children.

In a way, in the beginning, Job was thinking he loved his children more than God did. Would this God destroy his children when Job wanted them preserved? Christians face the same problem today when they think their loved ones may burn in hell eternally because God is going to do that -- and that puts people in the position of believing they are more merciful and loving than God.

I find that a frightening thought to have about God. I could not love God fully if I saw myself as more loving than Him; and if I believed He wished to destroy or punish people I care about, I would see Him as enemy. If I thought things like that, I fear I would have thought myself into separation from Him by thinking evil of Him where none exists. Then I would fear many things; and odds are that what I fear would come to pass, just as Job says what he feared came about.
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Old 02-12-2011, 07:02 AM
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Default Re: The Book of Job: how do you read it?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Giuliano View Post
The book says Job was righteous. It does not say he was wise.

There are two ways to spell "perfect" in Hebrew. The one used of Job is Tam = 440. The other way is Tamiym = 490. I believe Job was perfect in one way; but following "Pentecost," he was perfect in another.


This seems right since Elihu says:

Job 33:23 If there be a messenger with him, an interpreter, one among a thousand, to shew unto man his uprightness:
24 Then he is gracious unto him, and saith, Deliver him from going down to the pit: I have found a ransom.
25 His flesh shall be fresher than a child's: he shall return to the days of his youth:
26 He shall pray unto God, and he will be favourable unto him: and he shall see his face with joy: for he will render unto man his righteousness.


We saw (in the other thread) that Satan and Job's wife are not mentioned after Elihu appears. The question is if something has been transformed here? Has the "fallen spiritual nature" of Job as shown by Satan and his wife who tells him to curse God been transformed into the Holy Spirit as shown by Elihu?

I mention his wife since she reminds me of Sarah who laughed at God. She and Abraham could not conceive the child of promise correctly when Sarah had not yet mastered the serpent-nature within herself? We see Abraham and Sarah becoming one and Isaac born after Abraham is told to perfect himself. The text does not say Sarah perfected herself; but if the two are one, surely she did.

The name changes show something too. Abram picked up the feminine -h in his name; and Sarah acquired the masculine -yod. I think this shows how they both were no longer spiritually either male or female but both.

Interesting indeed! (I wish I was as well-versed/knowledgable in Hebrew as you are! This example also speaks to me of the idea of "reconciliation." Unity, and "the twain becoming one."

That is reflected too in how Sarah got Abraham into trouble by advising him to take Hagar as a concubine. This was the "fallen woman" speaking -- and Abram mistakenly heeded her. But later, God tells Abraham to HEED her -- obey whatever she advises. Something has changed.

On another subject entirely, we can see when comparing NT and OT how God can indeed "dismantle" what He said earlier, by providing a "higher way." The notion of "eye for an eye" was superceeded by "turn the other cheek." "Unwashed hands" was superceeded by "eat whatever is placed before you." In this respect, the Bible is like a jewelry box: many precious stones, but some more precious than others.

I think something changed too with Job's wife although it is not explicitly stated. There may have been something wrong with the first children -- just as there was something wrong with Esau.

Since I read both Job and Genesis as book of prophecies, it does not surprise me to see how Rebekkah is reversing some of the harm done by Eve; and if Job is read as an allegory of Israel, it would similar to the story of Rebekkah.

Another very interesting note.. worthy of exploration, I'm sure.

I wouldn't go too far down this path for fear of allowing my "humility" to be false humilty. I would say this, that it is God's pleasure that we do the right things and love others; and if we do that, it is then His Pleasure to reward us. Nothing good exists which does not come from God, that is just a fact. Pride or humilty are not relevant; but pride is an obstacle.

I completely agree that pride is a terrible sin. Sometimes I think it's the worst of all. Also, (and also worthy of another thread), I agree that all good things come from God. Evil comes from the Wicked one, who "comes to steal, kill and destroy." (See below.)

In a way, the best praise one can give God is to turn out well.

Amen! On another forum, someone asked, "what is the difference between righteousness and self-righteousness?" The reply that came to me was, "Righteousness: when God says that you are righteous. Self-righteousness: when you say that you're righteous."

Satan has his job to perform; and we see that God starts the conversation with him about Job. The "power" of Satan seems to me to be a breaking out of light on "the left side" which then congeals into an opposing force. This is the spiritual flaw which demands perfection now, without hope of mercy or forgiveness. If something is flawed, the satanic theory goes, it was a mistake to make it. It should be destroyed for its flaws following strict justice.

Can you elaborate?

Often there is some truth behind the accusations of Satan -- just as there was when he charged Joshua the High Priest of having soiled garments. That was the truth, but it was not an eternal truth. It was a passing kind of truth, in time only -- and God's solution was to provide clean garments. Mercy and forgiveness can solve things. The cry for "strict justice here and now" is not reasonable or correct even if it contains kernels of truth.
(Continued from above) :
we see that satan was given permission to act in Job's life. But in the "world view" of things, we see men acting, and tempests, etc. We can see how the flesh of man and the "fallen" condition of nature act either by the leading of the Spirit, or by "satan," which has no power except as God permits.

I recently made a post on another forum, saying that Jesus' temptation in the wilderness was coming from His own flesh/natural desires, or the "genetic coding" of Adam 1, which He was able to refuse because He had the Spirit of God within Him. There was no devil "outside" Him, but His own flesh was His devil, as is ours as well.

Thoughts?

Blessings,
brian
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Old 02-12-2011, 08:17 AM
Giuliano
 
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Default Re: The Book of Job: how do you read it?

Quote:
Originally Posted by ahigherway View Post
(Continued from above) :
we see that satan was given permission to act in Job's life.
Let me put it more emphatically that God brought Job to Satan's attention.

Quote:
But in the "world view" of things, we see men acting, and tempests, etc. We can see how the flesh of man and the "fallen" condition of nature act either by the leading of the Spirit, or by "satan," which has no power except as God permits.
There is are similarities between the Jesus and the satanic. Both are referred to as lions in the Bible; and Jesus compared himself to the serpent on the pole. Both see the defects in men. The critical difference it seems to me is that the Holy Christ Spirit sees defects and acts as intercessor while the satanic see the same defects as acts to condemn. The satanic
demand strict justice while the Christ Spirit takes repentance, change for the better and mercy into account.

That being said, it is wise to note that some people can experience the leading of the Holy Spirit as condemning. If they have an unforgiving spirit within them, it is hard for them to find forgiveness themselves. The sinful nature can experience the Divine as condemning and judgmental. It does not see how God could chasten those whom He loves. What may be sent to a person with a condemning spirit inwardly may be for his good but he will find it evil.

Thus, he can experience the correction of the Spirit of Christ like a lion raging. He may think Jesus wishes to punish him. He perceives Jesus as a lion.

Note how Jacob speaks:

Genesis 49:9 Judah is a lion's whelp: from the prey, my son, thou art gone up: he stooped down, he couched as a lion, and as an old lion; who shall rouse him up?
10 The sceptre shall not depart from Judah, nor a lawgiver from between his feet, until Shiloh come; and unto him shall the gathering of the people be.


The Lion rules until "peace" or "shiloh" comes. The same transition from lion to peace is shown in Revelation when the Lion of Judah is announced, but no Lion appears -- no, it is the Lamb of God:

Revelation 5:5 And one of the elders saith unto me, Weep not: behold, the Lion of the tribe of Juda, the Root of David, hath prevailed to open the book, and to loose the seven seals thereof.
6 And I beheld, and, lo, in the midst of the throne and of the four beasts, and in the midst of the elders, stood a Lamb as it had been slain, having seven horns and seven eyes, which are the seven Spirits of God sent forth into all the earth.


The "spirit" within man needs changing and transforming. If we allow that, we then experience the Spirit of Jesus as lamblike and not lionlike. There is a reasonable explanation then why God permits the satanic power -- so it can be transformed. We ought not think that Jesus was putting Peter down when he called him, "Satan." On the contrary, the strength and power, though misguided in Peter at first, was exactly what Jesus needed in Peter. Correct the spirit, and Peter's strength became an asset.

There are examples of this in Genesis. Laban is a wretch but he is a strong person. Jacob "robbed" him in more than one way. The "strength" of Laban was introduced into Israel by Jacob's marrying his two daughters.

We see also the "seed of Sodom" preserved by Lot; and the two "cursed tribes" got introduced into the Messianic line later. Later we see how even Jezebel's line got preserved through a daughter; and it ought not surprise us that Jesus had Jezebel for an ancestor. When Revelation 2:22 speaks of "killing her children with death," we need to remember Jesus was one of her children.
Quote:
I recently made a post on another forum, saying that Jesus' temptation in the wilderness was coming from His own flesh/natural desires, or the "genetic coding" of Adam 1, which He was able to refuse because He had the Spirit of God within Him.
This is very close to my views. I haven't been posting lately in the thread; but you can find the comments in the fourth post in the thread, Reflections on Genesis & other things.
Quote:
There was no devil "outside" Him, but His own flesh was His devil, as is ours as well.

Thoughts?
Yes and no.

I doubt you will believe me but I'll tell you anyway that I've seen and talked to Satan a few times. I cannot tell you I understand everything about him; but he appeared to me to be a real person. That does not mean I think God created "this person" to play the role. I can say that Satan appears to be the "big fellow" in the hierarchy of deluded spirits. His position does not seem to me to be necessarily a permanent one. Other deluded spirits, also guided by hate and anger, would rebel against him and replace him if they could. The hierarchy is not one based on love but on fear and intimidation. Once I saw him with another demon who appeared to be his loyal underling; but I would reckon that was kowtowing and flattery.

However when Satan is thrown out of Heaven like lightning, that is the "devil inside" us and not the "Devil out there." I may be talking about things which seem odd to you; but I believe in three heavens. If a person has spiritual error, his spirit is satanic to some extent or another. That person cannot usually stand in the Third Heaven. When it is time for him to correct himself, his "satanic side" is granted admission to the Third Heaven, and a trial results in God's court.

Thus, it was Job's "satanic side" which allowed "Satan" to show up in Heaven. Job's spiritual separation from God, based on his misconceptions and misgivings, was to be corrected. This "spiritual side" of Job, being satanic, accused the "lower aspects" of error. This sort of trial in God's courts does not move forward ordinarily unless God knows the outcome in advance. The person can be exonerated and justified, or the trial wouldn't go forward. I believe that "Satan" was transformed in the book of Job into "Elihu" at the end. The "lion" became the peaceful "lamb."

Jesus as the Lion of Judah must reign until Shiloh comes. Paul says the same thing in a different way:

1 Corinthians 15:22 For as in Adam all die , even so in Christ shall all be made alive.
23 But every man in his own order: Christ the firstfruits; afterward they that are Christ's at his coming.
24 Then cometh the end, when he shall have delivered up the kingdom to God, even the Father; when he shall have put down all rule and all authority and power.
25 For he must reign, till he hath put all enemies under his feet.
26 The last enemy that shall be destroyed is death.
27 For he hath put all things under his feet. But when he saith all things are put under him, it is manifest that he is excepted, which did put all things under him.
28 And when all things shall be subdued unto him, then shall the Son also himself be subject unto him that put all things under him, that God may be all in all.


When Revelation talks about Satan being tossed into the Lake of Fire, I take this to mean that whatever is left of the satanic force in mankind will be committed to the Sacred Flames. I do not see this as a "person" called Satan anymore than I see "death and hell" as people to be thrown into the Lake of Fire. Satan is a vague term as it is used in the Bible and can be used in different ways.

Did God or Satan tempt David? A cursory reading might lead us to think the Scriptures are contradicting themselves. I think we need caution in interpreting the following passages.

1 Chronicles 21:1 And Satan stood up against Israel, and provoked David to number Israel.

2 Samuel 24:1 And again the anger of the LORD was kindled against Israel, and he moved David against them to say, Go, number Israel and Judah.


We should not think the passages are contradicting each other; and we should not think that God and Satan are the same. I believe that when we are in a state of spiritual sin, we are satanic ourselves and empowering the forces of darkness (which could include any entities inclined to malice). Truly we fail the spiritual test if we see "Satan" as being "only out there" and fail to see the "satan in us." Why worry about "Satan out there" if darkness and abomination are within us and sitting in the Temple of God, making it desolate?
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Old 02-12-2011, 04:14 PM
ahigherway's Avatar
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Default Re: The Book of Job: how do you read it?

Very interesting addition you posted. (I didn't copy it here, since I couldn't post it with a URL in it!)

In my own life, I recall a moment when, in a moment's time, I felt a presence of wickedness which "left" me. I didn't know what it was all about at the time; I wasn't following the Lord, but I would say that He began a "saving" work in me at that time. It was powerful enough to get me off a dangerous path I was on, and little by little I was brought to a point where I wanted to know God personally.

So I certainly respect the spiritual experiences of others; who are we to say what we will be shown once we pass from this Earthly realm? We have so much to learn!

I guess if I had to lay out a type of "theology" as I see things right now, I would say that
first, Jesus Christ was Adam 2, who came to restore what Adam 1 destroyed. The condemnation, sin and death in mankind were replaced by Adam 2, Jesus Christ. That is why He is Lord of all. Our Life is in Him, there is no other.

second, although mankind has been given the Gift of Life through Adam 2, the realm of flesh/devil/sin continues to draw us, to derail us from the Life we have. We all have the "authority" to walk in Light, or walk in darkness. The Kingdom of God is "righteousness, peace and joy in the Holy Ghost." That means that the Kingdom is here now, we can know it today. Like the veil of the Temple which was torn in two, there is no division now between holy and profane. God is being revealed to all mankind, here a little, there a little.. and the churches can't contain the revelations that can come from God to any person at any time. Many churches are trying to "sew up" the veil again!

Thoughts?

Blessings,
brian
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Old 02-13-2011, 05:32 PM
Giuliano
 
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Default Re: The Book of Job: how do you read it?

Quote:
Originally Posted by ahigherway View Post
Very interesting addition you posted. (I didn't copy it here, since I couldn't post it with a URL in it!)
That restriction should end soon, I think. I don't recall how many posts are required before it gets lifted.

Quote:
In my own life, I recall a moment when, in a moment's time, I felt a presence of wickedness which "left" me. I didn't know what it was all about at the time; I wasn't following the Lord, but I would say that He began a "saving" work in me at that time. It was powerful enough to get me off a dangerous path I was on, and little by little I was brought to a point where I wanted to know God personally.
This makes sense to me. God is a discerner of the thoughts of the heart. What our conscious minds are chattering about may not be the most important thing. If the heart is going in the right direction, the errors of the conscious mind should get cleared up sooner or later.

As Elihu put it:

Job 33:14 For God speaketh once, yea twice, yet man perceiveth it not.
15 In a dream, in a vision of the night, when deep sleep falleth upon men, in slumberings upon the bed;
16 Then he openeth the ears of men, and sealeth their instruction,
17 That he may withdraw man from his purpose, and hide pride from man.


There are some experiences that precede the conscious choices; and I have seen a few people who betrayed their original revelations. They took up reading the Bible or attending church and fell into doubts about what first led in the direction of God. This can be a serious error. On the other hand, there are people who never doubt anything that crosses their minds and who can fall into serious self-delusions.

Quote:
So I certainly respect the spiritual experiences of others; who are we to say what we will be shown once we pass from this Earthly realm? We have so much to learn!
Not knowing can be fun at times.

Quote:
I guess if I had to lay out a type of "theology" as I see things right now, I would say that
first, Jesus Christ was Adam 2, who came to restore what Adam 1 destroyed. The condemnation, sin and death in mankind were replaced by Adam 2, Jesus Christ. That is why He is Lord of all. Our Life is in Him, there is no other.
I wouldn't say Adam 1 "destroyed" something. I'd say he damaged something and Jesus repaired it. While I won't argue about the word "sin," I also don't know if I would use that word although I believe Paul does. It can be used in a loose sense; but the first time "sin" is used in Genesis is when Cain killed Abel.

Let me plead on behalf of Adam and Eve. Eve's sin was not one of deliberate sin. She was deceived. I ask now what Adam should have done? He had been told to become one with her. Should he follow her example and eat of the fruit although he knew what he was doing? Or should he have said to himself that her sin was on her, she could die but he wouldn't share her fate? I tend to think he ate out of love for her. Doesn't Genesis say:

Genesis 2:24 Therefore shall a man leave his father and his mother, and shall cleave unto his wife: and they shall be one flesh.

It easy to read that passage to apply to us and say that married men should move out of their parents' houses; but I ask how it can be read to apply to Adam? Who was his father and mother? What would have happened if Adam hadn't fallen with Eve? Does it mean he loved her more than he loved God, or was it because he was willing to lay down his life for her, to love her as he loved his own body? This is a hard question.
Quote:
second, although mankind has been given the Gift of Life through Adam 2, the realm of flesh/devil/sin continues to draw us, to derail us from the Life we have. We all have the "authority" to walk in Light, or walk in darkness. The Kingdom of God is "righteousness, peace and joy in the Holy Ghost." That means that the Kingdom is here now, we can know it today. Like the veil of the Temple which was torn in two, there is no division now between holy and profane. God is being revealed to all mankind, here a little, there a little.. and the churches can't contain the revelations that can come from God to any person at any time. Many churches are trying to "sew up" the veil again!

Thoughts?
Sounds right to me.
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  #9  
Old 02-14-2011, 03:57 PM
Moses
 
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Default Re: The Book of Job: how do you read it?

Who are the sons of God?
Why Satan came among them? WHen asked Statan replied that he was SHat - sailing and Mithaleh - walking on the Earth.
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Old 02-14-2011, 09:29 PM
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Default Re: The Book of Job: how do you read it?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moses View Post
Who are the sons of God?
Why Satan came among them? WHen asked Statan replied that he was SHat - sailing and Mithaleh - walking on the Earth.
Any being is a son of God as God created all.
We are somewhat outcast from the family until we return.
Satan is an outcast as well but is free to roam as we are.

The book of Job is an example of the complexities of eating of the forbidden fruit and trying to render good over evil in knowing. Becoming as God is.

4 “You will not certainly die,” the serpent said to the woman. 5 “For God knows that when you eat from it your eyes will be opened, and you will be like God, knowing good and evil.”

All characters have been drawn into the eating of the fruit.

Elihu son of Barakel the Buzite, of the family of Ram:

The Genealogy of David
18 This, then, is the family line of Perez:

Perez was the father of Hezron,

19 Hezron the father of Ram,

Ram the father of Amminadab,

20 Amminadab the father of Nahshon,

Nahshon the father of Salmon,[d]

21 Salmon the father of Boaz,

Boaz the father of Obed,

22 Obed the father of Jesse,

and Jesse the father of David.

Somewhere in that genealogy I sense there is a reason why Elihu is involved with Job and has the character to sit and listen to Job and the 3 others with an open heart to the Lord.
Because of his genetics and openness to the Lord he is susceptible to the spirit presenting within him:

6 So Elihu son of Barakel the Buzite said:

“I am young in years,
and you are old;
that is why I was fearful,
not daring to tell you what I know.
7 I thought, ‘Age should speak;
advanced years should teach wisdom.’
8 But it is the spirit[b] in a person,
the breath of the Almighty, that gives them understanding.
9 It is not only the old[c] who are wise,
not only the aged who understand what is right.

The essence of the story (the whole Bible in fact) is the coming to the conclusion that GOD IS!

1 Then Job replied to the LORD:

2 “I know that you can do all things;
no purpose of yours can be thwarted.
3 You asked, ‘Who is this that obscures my plans without knowledge?’
Surely I spoke of things I did not understand,
things too wonderful for me to know.

4 “You said, ‘Listen now, and I will speak;
I will question you,
and you shall answer me.’
5 My ears had heard of you
but now my eyes have seen you.
6 Therefore I despise myself
and repent in dust and ashes.”

Last edited by CinderAsh : 02-14-2011 at 09:34 PM. Reason: Tried to make bold words. Enhancements don't seem to be working.
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