True2Ourselves
Already a member? login
Divider
Divider
Divider
Divider
Divider
Divider
Divider
Divider
Divider
Divider
Divider
Divider
  
+
Register FAQ A-Z directory Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

True2Ourselves Forums   > Community Topics > Theology  > Is There a Queen in the Kingdom of Heaven?

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 04-04-2016, 08:11 PM
CatholicCrusader's Avatar
Knight of the Forum
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 9,208
Arrow Is There a Queen in the Kingdom of Heaven?


Is There a Queen in the Kingdom of Heaven?

By Tim Staples - source link

Pope Pius XII effectively summarized the core reasons Christians ought to honor Mary with the title of Queen of Heaven and Earth:
According to ancient tradition and the sacred liturgy the main principle on which the royal dignity of Mary rests is without doubt her divine motherhood. In holy writ, concerning the son whom Mary will conceive, we read this sentence: “He shall be called the son of the most high, and the Lord God shall give unto him the throne of David his father, and he shall reign in the house of Jacob forever, and of his kingdom there will be no end,” and in addition Mary is called “Mother of the Lord,” from this it is easily concluded that she is a queen, since she bore a son who, at the very moment of his conception, because of the hypostatic union of the human nature with the Word, was also as man, king and lord of all things. So with complete justice St. John Damascene could write: “When she became mother of the creator, she truly became queen of every creature.” Likewise, it can be said that the heavenly voice of the Archangel Gabriel was the first to proclaim Mary’s royal office (Ad Caeli Reginam, 34).
In a future blog post, I will give more positive reasons for faith in Mary as Queen of Heaven and Earth, but many Protestants I speak to cannot get past one biblical text from the Old Testament that casts a shadow over this topic like none other. In Roman Catholics and Evangelicals—Agreements and Differences, Norman Geisler and Ralph MacKenzie present that text along with their commentary that represents the misguided faith of millions. And that text is Jeremiah 7:18:
Do you not see what they are doing in the streets of Judah and in the streets of Jerusalem? The children gather wood, the fathers kindle fire, and the women knead dough, to make cakes for the queen of heaven; and they pour out drink offerings to other gods, to provoke me to anger.
Geisler and MacKenzie comment:
To call Mary “Queen of Heaven,” knowing that this very phrase comes from an old pagan idolatrous cult condemned in the Bible (cf. Jer. 7:18), only invites the charge of Mariolatry. And Mariolatry is idolatry (p. 322).
I can certainly sympathize with their thinking here. I once thought the same. But the truth is: this text has absolutely nothing to do with the Blessed Mother as Queen of Heaven for at least three reasons:
  1. Jeremiah here condemns the adoration of the Mesopotamian goddess Astarte (see Raymond Brown, S.S., Joseph Fitzmeyer, S.J., Roland E. Murphy, editors, The Jerome Biblical Commentary, Prentice-Hall, Inc., Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1968, p. 310). She is in no way related to Mary. In fact, “she” did not and does not exist in reality. Mary, on the other hand, was a real historical person who was—and is—a queen by virtue of the fact that her son was—and is—the king.
  2. Jeremiah condemned offering sacrifice to “the queen of heaven.” In Scripture, we have many examples of the proper way we should honor great members of the kingdom of God. We give “double honor” to “elders who rule well” in the Church (1 Tim. 5:17). St. Paul tells us we should “esteem very highly” those who are “over [us] in the Lord” (1 Thess. 5:12-13). We sing praises to great members of the family of God who have gone before us (Psalm 45:17). We bow down to them with reverence (1 Kings 2:19). We carry out the work of the Lord in their names (Matt. 10:40-42, DRV), and more. But there is one thing we ought never to do: offer sacrifice to them. Offering sacrifice is tantamount to the adoration that is due God alone. And this is precisely what Jeremiah was condemning. The Catholic Church does not teach—and has never taught—that we should adore Mary (see CCC 2110-2114; Lumen Gentium 66-67; CCC 971). Catholics offer sacrifice exclusively to God.
  3. To the Evangelical and Fundamentalist, the mere fact that worshipping someone called “queen of heaven” is condemned in Jeremiah 7 eliminates the possibility of Mary being the true Queen of Heaven and Earth. This simply does not follow. The existence of a counterfeit queen does not mean there can’t be an authentic one. This reasoning followed to its logical end would lead to abandoning the entire Christian Faith! We could not have a Bible because Hinduism, Islam, and many other false religions have “holy books.” We could not call Jesus Son of God because Zeus and Hera had Apollo, Isis and Osiris had Horus, etc. The fact that there was a false “queen of heaven” worshipped in ancient Mesopotamia does not negate the reality of the true queen who is honored as such in the kingdom of God.
If you enjoyed this and want to know more, click here.
__________________

"God in his deepest mystery is not a solitude but a family, since he has in himself fatherhood, sonship and the essence of the family which is love"
- Saint Pope John Paul II
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 04-08-2016, 05:25 PM
CatholicCrusader's Avatar
Knight of the Forum
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 9,208
Default Re: Is There a Queen in the Kingdom of Heaven?

Part Two is here: Is There a Queen in the Kingdom of Heaven? Pt. II | Catholic Answers
I will post it soon.
__________________

"God in his deepest mystery is not a solitude but a family, since he has in himself fatherhood, sonship and the essence of the family which is love"
- Saint Pope John Paul II
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 04-08-2016, 06:56 PM
NCC
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Is There a Queen in the Kingdom of Heaven?

The Old Testament prefigures Mary as being the Mother of God and the Queen of Heaven (these two titles are tied together).

In the time of King Solomon until the final Kings of Judah, the Queen Mother sat on the right hand of her son (the king). She was both his confidant and advisor. Jesus is the New Testament Davidic King; Mary, His mother, is the New Testament Queen Mother.

In Luke's Gospel, Mary is called the "Mother of my Lord." (Lk.1:43) This is the story of Mary being greeted by Elizabeth, who exclaims that Mary is blessed among women, and blessed also is the fruit of Mary's womb--Jesus. Elizabeth then asks, no doubt in great excitement:

Quote:
Luke 1:43 (NKJV)

43 But why is this granted to me, that the mother of my Lord should come to me?

The significance here is that, in the Jewish world, the title “Lord”was a title reserved for God, Yahweh. Also note that in the Greek New Testament, the title “Lord,”or “Kyrios”refers only to God.

Now look at vs. 45, where Elizabeth speaks further, assuring Mary that those things told to her by God will indeed be fulfilled:

Quote:
Luke 1:45 (NKJV)

45 Blessed is she who believed (Mary), for there will be a fulfillment of those things which were told her from the Lord (God).”
The word "Lord" in these verses means "God." Thus, Elizabeth asks how it is that the Mother of God has come to her, and then she professes that all things told to Mary by God will be fulfilled.

Jesus is Lord and King; Mary, His blessed mother, sits at the right hand of her Son, as His confidant, advisor, and as Queen of Heaven.

It is most important to note that all Marion devotion will always point directly to Jesus, because Mary, our Queen, will ever and always point us to Her Son: our King. Never is Mary to be adored; adoration is reserved for God alone. But Mary, as the Mother of God and the Queen of Heaven, is to be highly revered, esteemed, respected, and loved. To offer her less is to insult the King who is our Savior.

If you consider it with open mind, it is only sensible that if we have a King, we have a Queen; if we have a Father in Heaven, we have a Mother. This is a beautiful concept, completing the family covenant of God: Father, Mother, and Children of God.

Quote:
John 1:12 (NKJV)

12 But as many as received Him, to them He gave the right to become children of God, to those who believe in His name:

Last edited by NCC : 04-08-2016 at 07:58 PM.
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 04-08-2016, 07:04 PM
NCC
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Is There a Queen in the Kingdom of Heaven?

(Not sure why my quotes posted so tiny. Sorry.)

Edit: Tried to fix them, and they looked great on the Kindle, but, now, on the laptop, they're huge.

Hmm . . .Maybe I'd best do the posting stuff on the laptop.

Obviously I'm still figuring out the html . . . lol

Last edited by NCC : 04-09-2016 at 01:23 PM.
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 04-08-2016, 07:57 PM
NCC
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Is There a Queen in the Kingdom of Heaven?

Good info in OP refuting Jeremiah 7:18 as reason to not acknowledge Mary as Queen of Heaven.
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 04-08-2016, 09:28 PM
CatholicCrusader's Avatar
Knight of the Forum
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 9,208
Arrow Re: Is There a Queen in the Kingdom of Heaven?


^
Wonderful posts NCC. Thank you.
__________________

"God in his deepest mystery is not a solitude but a family, since he has in himself fatherhood, sonship and the essence of the family which is love"
- Saint Pope John Paul II
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 04-08-2016, 09:28 PM
CatholicCrusader's Avatar
Knight of the Forum
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 9,208
Arrow Re: Is There a Queen in the Kingdom of Heaven?


And here's Part Two......


Is There a Queen in the Kingdom of Heaven? Pt. II
By Tim Staples - source link

As I wrote in an earlier blog post, Pope Pius XII summarized the core reasons Christians ought to honor Mary with the title of Queen of Heaven and Earth in Ad Caeli Reginam, 34:
According to ancient tradition and the sacred liturgy, the main principle on which the royal dignity of Mary rests is without doubt her divine motherhood. In holy writ, concerning the son whom Mary will conceive, we read this sentence: “He shall be called the son of the most high, and the Lord God shall give unto him the throne of David his father, and he shall reign in the house of Jacob forever, and of his kingdom there will be no end,” and in addition Mary is called “Mother of the Lord.” From this it is easily concluded that she is a queen, since she bore a son who, at the very moment of his conception, because of the hypostatic union of the human nature with the Word, was also, as man, king and lord of all things. So with complete justice St. John Damascene could write: “When she became mother of the creator, she truly became queen of every creature.” Likewise, it can be said that the heavenly voice of the Archangel Gabriel was the first to proclaim Mary’s royal office.
If we understand that Jesus is the king of Israel, then we know who Mary is: the queen mother. It really is that simple.

I will now add Revelation 12:1-2; 5; 17 to the mix in demonstrating Mary’s queenship:
And a great sign appeared in heaven, a woman clothed with the sun, with the moon under her feet, and on her head a crown of twelve stars; she was with child. . . . [S]he brought forth a male child, one who is to rule all the nations with a rod of iron, but her child was caught up to God and to his throne. . . . Then the dragon was angry with the woman, and went off to make war on the rest of her offspring, on those who keep the commandments of God and bear testimony to Jesus.
Here Mary is clearly depicted as a cosmic queen giving birth to both Christ and all Christians, all the while wearing her royal crown. She rules and reigns with her divine son at the center of the perennial battle between the kingdom of God and the kingdoms of this world in union with “the serpent” of old. These texts alone demonstrate Mary to be queen of the kingdom of Christ.

But here’s the problem. Although Pope Pius XII says “it is easily concluded that [Mary] is a queen,” it is not so easy for billions outside of the Catholic Church to conclude. For the skeptic, then, I am now going to show how a fuller understanding of Old Testament typology can be the key to illuminating the truth of Mary’s queenship.


Hidden in the old and revealed in the new

The “kingdom of David”—which Christ came to (in a sense) re-constitute, in accord with prophecy—is the most prominent type of “the kingdom of Christ” in the New Covenant, and it also reveals Mary’s role as queen of that New Covenant kingdom.
I will raise up your [King David’s] offspring after you, who shall come forth from your body, and I will establish his kingdom. He shall build a house for my name, and I will establish the throne of his kingdom forever. I will be his father, and he shall be my son (2 Sam. 7:12-14).

For to us a child is born, to us a son is given; and the government will be upon his shoulder, and his name will be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace. Of the increase of his government and of peace there will be no end, upon the throne of David, and over his kingdom, to establish it, and to uphold it with justice and with righteousness from this time forth and for evermore. The zeal of the Lord of hosts will do this (Isa. 9:6-7).
From the very first verse of the New Testament (Matt. 1:1) through the book of Revelation (3:7), we find Jesus referred to as this prophetic “son of David,” or “the holy one, the true one, who has the key of David.” There can be no doubt that Christ is revealed as the king. But what is revealed to us about a queen?

Scott Hahn provides the answer in the remarkable ancient office and Old Testament type of the gebirah (Hebrew, "great lady"):
In the ancient Near East, most nations were monarchies ruled by a king. In addition, most cultures practiced polygamy; so a given king often had several wives. This posed problems. First, whom should the people honor as queen? But more important, whose son should receive the right of succession to the throne? In most Near Eastern cultures, these twin problems were resolved by a single custom. The woman ordinarily honored as queen was not the wife of the king, but the mother of the king (Hail, Holy Queen, p. 78).
It can be difficult for us in the modern Western world to understand ancient monarchical concepts. But first-century Jews understood the notion of the kingdom that Jesus preached because they lived it. They knew that a kingdom meant that there was a king. And, in ancient Israel as in many nearby cultures, if there was a king there was a queen mother:
Now when Athaliah the mother of Ahaziah saw that her son was dead, she arose and destroyed all the royal family. But Jehosheba, the daughter of King Joram, sister of Ahaziah, took Joash the son of Ahaziah, and stole him away from among the king’s sons who were about to be slain, and she put him and his nurse in a bedchamber. Thus she hid him from Athaliah, so that he was not slain; and he remained with her six years, hid in the house of the Lord, while Athaliah reigned over the land (2 Kings 11:1-4).
Queen Athaliah ruled in Israel for six years after her son, King Ahaziah, died. She was a wicked woman and so may not seem to be the greatest type of the Blessed Mother. But then there were many wicked kings in ancient Israel too, who were nonetheless types of Christ. (Even the great King David himself is well-known for his moral failings.) Leaving aside Athaliah’s wickedness, we see in this text a scriptural example of the importance and the authority of the queen mother.
Even Maacah, his mother, King Asa removed from being queen mother because she had made an abominable image for Asherah. Asa cut down her image, crushed it, and burned it at the brook Kidron (2 Chron. 15:16).
Queen Mother Maacah was not exactly a picture of holiness, either. But her office was a powerful one in ancient Israel. Maacha held royal authority and was only deposed from it because she made an idol.
Say to the king and the queen mother: “Take a lowly seat, for your beautiful crown has come down from your head” (Jer. 13:18).
Both the king and the queen mother wore royal crowns, just as Mary is depicted so wearing in Revelation 12:1.

Perhaps the best example of the power and authority of the queen mother in the Old Testament is found personified in Bathsheba:
Then Nathan said to Bathsheba the mother of Solomon, “Have you not heard that Adonijah the son of Haggith has become king and David our lord does not know it? Now therefore come, let me give you counsel, that you may save your own life and the life of your son Solomon. Go in at once to King David, and say to him, “Did you not, my lord the king, swear to your maidservant, saying, ‘Solomon your son shall reign after me, and he shall sit upon my throne’? Why then is Adonijah king?” Then while you are still speaking with the king, I will come in after you and confirm your words. So Bathsheba went to the king in to his chamber (now the king was very old, and Abishag the Shunamite was ministering to the king). Bathsheba bowed and did obeisance to the king, and the king said, “What do you desire?”. . . While she was still speaking with the king, Nathan the prophet came in (1 Kings 1:11-16, 22).
While King David was still alive, Bathsheba was merely one among many of his wives. As such, she had to bow before her husband when making a request of him. In this case, in order to ensure that her request would be granted, she needed the aid of Nathan the prophet. However, after David’s death, Bathsheba received a crown and a drastic change in authority. Bathsheba became the queen mother.
Then Adonijah the son of Haggith came to Bathsheba the mother of Solomon. And she said, “Do you come peaceably?” He said, “Peaceably.” Then he said, “I have something to say to you.” She said, “Say on.” He said, “You know that the kingdom was mine, and that all Israel fully expected me to reign; however the kingdom has turned about and become my brother’s, for it was his from the Lord. And now I have one request to make of you; do not refuse me.” She said to him, “Say on.” And he said, “Pray ask King Solomon—he will not refuse you—to give me Abishag the Shunammite as my wife.” Bathsheba said, “Very well; I will speak for you to the king.”

So Bathsheba went to King Solomon, to speak to him on behalf of Adonijah. And the king rose to meet her, and bowed down to her; then he sat on his throne and had a seat brought for the king’s mother; and she sat on his right. Then she said, “I have one small request to make of you; do not refuse me.” And the king said to her, “Make your request, my mother; for I will not refuse you.” She said, “Let Abishag the Shunammite be given to Adonijah your brother as his wife.” King Solomon answered his mother, “And why do you ask Abishag the Shunammite for Adonijah? Ask for him the kingdom also; for he is my elder brother, and on his side are Abiathar the priest and Joab the son of Zeruiah.” Then King Solomon swore by the Lord, saying, “God do so to me and more also if this word does not cost Adonijah his life!” (1 Kings 2:13-23).
What a change! Once, Bathsheba bowed to the king. Now the new king—Solomon—bowed to her. (At that time the king of Israel bowed to no one except God—and evidently the queen mother.) As wife of the king, Bathsheba had to beg her husband David for a favor with the assistance of the prophet Nathan. As queen mother, Bathsheba needed no assistance and would be refused nothing.

The high degree of power and authority wielded by the queen mother in the kingdom of Israel gives us a context to appreciate in a deeper way the intercessory power of Mary as exemplified, for example, at the wedding feast of Cana in John 2. Am I saying that whatever Mary asks will be brought to pass by her divine son? Yes, I am. If it was so for the Old Covenant type, how could it be anything less for the New Covenant fulfillment? We should always keep in mind, however, that Mary will never ask her Son to do anything that is contrary to his will. Her perfectly obedient will is only to do his will.


Queen and mother prophesied

Psalm 45:1-9a prophesies in some detail about Christ the king:
My heart overflows with a goodly theme; I address my verses to the king… In your majesty ride forth victoriously for the cause of truth and to defend the right. . . . Your divine throne endures forever and ever. Your royal scepter is a scepter of equity; you love righteousness and hate wickedness. Therefore God, your God, has anointed you with the oil of gladness above your fellows; your robes are all fragrant. . . . From ivory palaces stringed instruments make you glad; daughters of kings are among your ladies of honor.
In the New Testament, the inspired author of Hebrews 1:8-9 quotes verses 6-7 of this very text as referring to Christ, his divinity, and his kingship. But immediately following those verses is another, lesser-known, prophecy that speaks of Mary:
. . . [A]t your right hand stands the queen in gold of Ophir. Hear, O daughter, consider, and incline your ear; forget your people and your father’s house; and the king will desire your beauty. Since he is your lord, bow to him; the people of Tyre will sue your favor with gifts, the richest of the people with all kinds of wealth. The daughter of the king is decked in her chamber with gold-woven robes; in many-colored robes she is led to the king, with her virgin companions, her escort, in her train. With joy and gladness they are led along as they enter the palace of the king. Instead of your fathers shall be your sons; you will make them princes in all the earth. I will cause your name to be celebrated in all generations; therefore the peoples will praise you forever and ever (Heb. 9b-17).
Set in the context of a royal wedding, on the literal level this psalm referred to the king of Israel, likely Solomon, receiving a new bride, with his mother standing at his right to symbolize her power and authority. But on the spiritual level it refers to Christ and Mary. T.E. Bird says of this text:
But although the poem may have been written in honor of a royal wedding (probably Solomon’s), the inspired writer’s thoughts reach beyond the actual event; he sees a king fairer than an ordinary man (3), one whom he addresses as “God” (7,8), one whose throne is to remain forever (7), whose rule is to extend over the world. . . . It is not surprising, therefore, that Jews and Christians have seen here the espousals between the Messiah and his people. The Targum treats the Psalm as strictly Messianic; St. John Chrysostom could say that on this point Jews and Christians were agreed (PG 55, 183); St. Thomas Aquinas gives the Catholic interpretation: “The subject matter of this psalm is the espousals between Christ and the Church.” On feasts of the Blessed Virgin, the Psalm is recited as Matins; (10-16) are applied to her as the Spouse of the Holy Ghost and the Queen of Heaven (A Catholic Commentary on Sacred Scripture, p. 456).
Who is this woman of whom the Lord said, “I will cause your name to be celebrated in all generations; therefore the peoples will praise you forever and ever”? Not one of Solomon’s wives fit the prophetic description.

Most every Christian—indeed most of the world beyond Christendom—knows the name of the Mother of God—Mary—who in fulfillment of this prophetic text said, “All generations shall call me blessed" (Luke 1:48).

If you enjoyed this and would like learn more, click here.
__________________

"God in his deepest mystery is not a solitude but a family, since he has in himself fatherhood, sonship and the essence of the family which is love"
- Saint Pope John Paul II
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 04-09-2016, 05:55 AM
NCC
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Is There a Queen in the Kingdom of Heaven?

Key to understanding Mary as queen is this:

"The woman ordinarily honored as queen was not the wife of the king, but the mother of the king" (Hail, Holy Queen, p. 78).


I was confused by Psalm 45:16, which reads, "Instead of your fathers shall be your sons ..."

The NIV cleared it up: "Your sons will become kings like their father."

I was also struck by this from Rev. 12: "Then the dragon was angry with the woman, and went off to make war on the rest of her offspring, on those who keep the commandments of God and bear testimony to Jesus."

As "her offspring" (because she is our mother, as well as our queen) we see the battle we face: Satan makes war on her children. As her children, then, it seems the closer we are to her and to Jesus, and to the Father, the more Satan's focus will be on us.

"In this world you will have trouble ..."

Ironically, we can count it all joy when we are thus persecuted, though it may not "feel" joyful in the midst of trouble.
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 04-09-2016, 06:12 AM
winsome's Avatar
Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 2,206
Default Re: Is There a Queen in the Kingdom of Heaven?

Quote:
Originally Posted by NCC View Post
Key to understanding Mary as queen is this:

"The woman ordinarily honored as queen was not the wife of the king, but the mother of the king" (Hail, Holy Queen, p. 78).
Exactly!

After Solomon the kingdom splits into the Northern kingdom (Israel) and the Southern kingdom (Judah). After this there were 20 kings in Israel before the deportation to Assyria. For none of these is the mother of the king mentioned.

There were 19 kings in Judah after Solomon before they were deported to Babylon. In 17 of these the king’s mother is given, usually after introducing the king, with the words “his mother’s name was ……”. This in itself shows that the king’s mother was a significant figure.

One other point that I think hasn’t been mentioned previously is that we can also see the important position of the queen mother in Jeremiah 13:18-20

“Say to the king and the queen mother: ‘Take a lowly seat, for your beautiful crown has come down from your head. The cities of the Negeb are shut up, with none to open them; all Judah is taken into exile, wholly taken into exile. "Lift up your eyes and see those who come from the north. Where is the flock that was given you, your beautiful flock?’”
Three points to note here.

Firstly Jeremiah is told to address both the king and queen mother. They are both to be punished by God.

Secondly both the king and queen mother are to come down from their thrones and to lose their crowns. They are both royalty in the kingdom.

Thirdly God says to them: “Where is the flock that was given you, your beautiful flock?”
They are both responsible for the flock, the sheep – i.e. the people that God entrusted to them. God had given the queen mother responsibilities for the people, not just the king. That does not mean that the queen mother was equal in authority to the king. The authority she had was derived from and under the king. She was still subject to him.

Mary is the mother of Jesus As the mother of the King of Heaven, Mary has the right to the title Queen of Heaven.

As such she has some responsibility for the flock.

No wonder Jesus couldn’t offer James and John the seat at his right hand (Mt 28:23). It was already allocated.
__________________
It isn't learned talk that saves man or makes a saint of him; only a life well lived can claim God's friendship. (Thomas À Kempis)
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 04-09-2016, 01:26 PM
NCC
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Is There a Queen in the Kingdom of Heaven?

Quote:
Quote winsome: No wonder Jesus couldn’t offer James and John the seat at his right hand (Mt 28:23). It was already allocated.
Ahh, yes, I hadn't thought of that!
Digg this Post!Add Post to del.icio.usBookmark Post in TechnoratiFurl this Post!
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Queen of Heaven CatholicCrusader Theology 39 01-09-2013 07:37 PM
Mary - Queen Of Heaven CatholicCrusader Theology 262 07-23-2012 07:42 PM
The kingdom of heaven colin Theology 3 03-24-2010 11:07 AM
Kingdom of God And Kingdom of Heaven Servant Bible Chat 12 09-06-2009 04:04 PM
Kingdom of God is w/in but where's Heaven? antonio Bible Chat 10 04-01-2009 04:55 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:32 AM.


true2ourselves
 
 
 

Flashcoms

You need to upgrade your Flash Player.

Version 8 or higher is required.

download from http://www.adobe.com/go/getflashplayer

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29